Grafica e design senza la Suite

Spesso e volentieri una massiccia ed incalzante operazione di marketing può influenzare se non condizionare un intero settore commerciale e professionale.
Uno di questi è sicuramente il settore della grafica che nonostante negli ultimi 10 anni abbia subìto un’espansione trasversale (lo dico per i meno informati) la maggior parte dei “professionisti” ha difficoltà a seguire l’innovazione fosse anche solo per allargare il campo della conoscenza.

È oramai diffusa l’idea, sbagliata, che per poter fare grafica di un certo livello sia obbligatorio utilizzare solo certi software. Da qui la diffusione di suite che hanno in parte arricchito il mercato ma in parte hanno indebolito (ed in alcuni casi annientato) la professionalità.

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Andrea Astolfi is a creative professional with over 20 years of experience in electronic publishing. Andrea is based in Italy and specializes in the production of books and long documents, characterized by the presence of many images and illustrations.

Andrea Astolfi, grafico impaginatore con esperienza ventennale nel settore dell’editoria elettronica. Specializzato nella realizzazione di libri con molte pagine caratterizzate dalla presenza di molte immagini e illustrazioni.

QuarkXPress on OS X Yosemite

Does QuarkXPress support the new version of OS X, 10.10, better known as Yosemite?

For all details please see here: http://forums.quark.com/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=26772

In a nutshell:

  • In QuarkXPress 10.2 and 10.2.1 Quark has already added fixes for Yosemite, so it is expected to run well under OS X Yosemite, though 10.2.x is not officially supported on Yosemite. Quark recommends using 10.2.1.
  • Quark is currently testing QuarkXPress intensively on the release build of Yosemite in all languages.
  • Quark will release a new version of QuarkXPress 10, called version 10.5, soon. Estimate is to release it in about ten to twenty days, depending on the test results, so either last week of October or first week of November.
  • QuarkXPress will automatically notify you via the Auto Updater.
  • QuarkXPress 10.5 will be officially supported on OS X Yosemite.
  • QuarkXPress 10.5 will be free of charge for everybody owning a license of QuarkXPress 10.x.

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

CMYK, RGB or sRGB for publishing to iPads and Android tablets?

CMYK, RGB or sRGB?

When publishing to tablets, often I get asked what color model to use. And especially as many publishers or corporates want to reuse Print articles and pictures, they ask whether it is ok to use CMYK, as converting would add additional time.

As always the question isn’t really easy to answer, as it depends on the system or solution you have and of course also on the device you expect your customers and readers to use. And even if you know what tablet all your readers will have, e.g. as you are creating an in-house app using Apple’s Enterprise program and you only distribute iPads with Retina Display (aka iPad4), it is tough to answer, as the ambiance light and brightness setting of the devices also influence perceived color.

So let’s assume you are publishing to iOS devices only. Apple changed the color performance of their devices significantly over generations. The iPhone for example uses a limited sRGB space whereas the colorspace of the iPhone 5 is almost identical to sRGB. The iPad mini however has again a limited sRGB space again, so even smaller than sRGB.

On Android devices it is similar, though newer devices like the Nexus 7 and the Kindle Fire HD again have a colorspace almost identical to sRGB.

So my general advice can only be: Use sRGB (not RGB!) as your target colorspace and test!

Automated or manual conversion?

That’s a tough one to answer. It really depends whether you are using a software or solution to publish digitally or whether you do it by hand. As far as I know, currently no tablet or smartphone uses ICC profiles to calibrate its screen so far, when you use alternative browsers like mobile Firefox it can be possible (but, will the majority of your readers use that? Probably not).

So if you publish manually (meaning, you are not using a solution), I’d recommend to convert manually (e.g. batch converting all pictures) to sRGB.

If you are using a Digital Publishing software solution, such as App Studio, then you should be fine using CMYK as App Studio automatically uses an sRGB output profile. However it’s probably a good idea to simulate sRGB on screen (using the Color Management function of InDesign or QuarkXPress) to see the close to final results.
Still, do proof-check on at least a few devices to see whether color looks as expected, as laptop screens and computer monitors typically have a wider colorspace (RGB) than tablets (sRGB).

Further reading

If you want to read more details about the screens of mobile devices, then I can recommend dot-color.com, which I found really helpful:

Do tablets show accurate color?
http://dot-color.com/2012/12/19/are-tablets-up-to-the-task-of-accurate-color-testing/

Color performance compared:
http://dot-color.com/2012/11/28/shopping-for-a-tablet-this-holiday-season-dont-forget-to-look-at-color-performance/

Color performance of the iPhone 5:
http://dot-color.com/2012/09/27/how-does-the-iphone-5s-color-saturation-measure-up-against-apples-claims/

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.