“The Quark Game” Built Entirely in QuarkXPress

The Flash capabilities of QuarkXPress far surpass those of InDesign. (In my view, InDesign just lets you export page-turning Flash animations, while QuarkXPress lets you author complex Flash content.)

While Flash is clearly on its way out, there are still a few more years of life in it. And, although Quark hasn’t announced that their Interactive layout space will soon export to HTML5 (which is likely to replace Flash on the Web), I expect that it will.

Therefore, I am very happy to share with you a remarkable Flash project that was authored in QuarkXPress. It was created by Jonas Bohlin and is called “The Quark Game”. Have a look at it here.

If you’re impressed, you can even buy a “QuarkXPress Flash Learning Kit” for just $4.44. It includes the QuarkXPress document files, animation files, sound files, and soundtracks, along with tutorials and templates.

(By the way, I had trouble getting through this game — but then I’m a little older than their target audience.)

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Motionographer Website Inspires Motion Designers

The Interactive layout space in QuarkXPress gives you powerful tools for creating graphics that move and interact with the user. If you’re looking for inspiration in the realm of motion design, check out www.motionographer.com. They feature some of the best work from studios and individuals, and interviews with successful designers.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Adobe Kills Mobile Flash Player

Adobe recently killed the Mobile Flash Player and will instead focus its efforts on Flash for desktop computers.

Adobe conceded that Flash just isn’t suited for mobile devices and that HTML 5 and CSS are much better options — something Apple has been saying for years. The change isn’t much of a surprise since Apple has been anti-Flash for some time, and Microsoft recently said it won’t support Flash in Internet Explorer 10’s Metro touch-based mode.

This doesn’t signal the end of Flash, but it does take away much of the incentive Web developers have to code for the platform since mobile devices are becoming more popular for online surfing.

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.

Convert Flash to HTML5 for Free

QuarkXPress has powerful tools for creating Flash-based animations. If you would like to convert those animations to a universally supported industry standard, consider these free services:

Swiffy:

Google Labs’ Swiffy is a free service for converting animations from SWF (Flash) format to HTML5, bringing them into compliance with Web standards and making them usable on iOS devices such as Apple’s iPad and iPhone. Swiffy shows you a preview of your existing SWF animation and the HTML5 version before you download it.

Swiffy also lets you preview the converted file on your mobile device — just by pointing your mobile device at the QR code displayed on the Web page! Try it at http://swiffy.googlelabs.com. (Note: file sizes may grow, so be sure to check that.)

Wallaby:

If your animations are in FLA format (native to Flash Professional), instead try Adobe’s Wallaby service at http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/wallaby/

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.

Convert Flash to HTML 5 and Other Formats

As you know, QuarkXPress lets you create Flash animations — from simple to quite advanced. If you want to convert your Flash-based animations into other formats, check out these options:

Google Labs’ Swiffy is a free service for converting animations from SWF (Flash) format to HTML 5, bringing them into compliance with Web standards and making them usable on iOS devices such as Apple’s iPad and iPhone. Swiffy shows you a preview of your existing SWF animation and the HTML 5 version before you download it. Swiffy also lets you preview the converted file on your mobile device — just by pointing your mobile device at the QR code displayed on the Web page! Try it at http://swiffy.googlelabs.com.

(Note: file sizes may grow, so be sure to check that.)

_____________________________________________

If your animations are in FLA format (native to Flash Professional), instead try Adobe’s Wallaby service.

_____________________________________________

Another option for converting SWF or Flash video to other formats such as .mp4 for iPod and iPhone is Macvide’s FlashVideo Converter ($100). It converts SWF files and Flash video to QuickTime (.mov), iPhone/iPod (.mp4), Mobile .3gp, DVD video (MPEG2) and other formats, with control over video resolution, frame rate, audio settings and more.

_____________________________________________

If you only need to convert Flash video, try iFunia’s Media Converter for Mac ($49), which converts video and audio content between formats. It supports formats such as AVI, MKV, FLV, MPEG, WMV, H.264, MP4 and MOV, can convert HD video, offers batch conversion, and includes output options for the iPhone and iPad, Apple TV, iDVD and Final Cut Pro, and other portable media players. It also includes editing tools for trimming or combining video and audio clips, splitting clips, adding effects, and watermarking videos.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.