QuarkXPress 2015 Webinar Series almost ending – Color Management still to come

Quark’s free 2015 Webinar Series has almost come to its end, with the webinar about footnotes & endnotes posted today:

https://youtu.be/XabghAhASdY?list=PLXedOct8sKnbLmQ0zpWJLvCn4eI1neEx-

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The last webinar this year still to come is on December 1, 2015, about color management in QuarkXPress 2015.

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Badia Printools: MUCH Better Printing from QuarkXPress

Printools_icon

Badia Software’s Printools is an XTension for any version of QuarkXPress (currently 4–10) that adds many new features when printing. This $99.99 XTension provides a live preview shows you in real time an exact representation of how the output will look as you change the print settings, including paper boundaries, single pages or spreads, crop marks, manual or automatic tiling, page rotation, bleeds, and negative printing. You can even manually tile a page by dragging the mouse over the preview area.

Its preview also shows page scaling, and color mode (color, gray or black-and-white). It can also warn you when the document size is larger than the paper in the printer or imagesetter.

One really useful thing it can do that we wish QuarkXPress could do is output all the Layouts in a Project at once.

It can preflight a document to detect RGB images, text overflows, missing fonts, suppressed items, EPS with JPEG compression, hairlines, unknown image formats, and low resolution pictures. It can also automatically check every document before it is printed.

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It can add a temporary page border, and add page slugs showing owner name, machine name, bleed, scaling, line screen, emulsion and any custom text you like.

You can batch print multiple documents using the same output settings, or create PostScript or PDF files from batches of documents.

Printools-savetofile

Its Rename at Print feature can automatically rename files at print time using any combination of the project or layout names, page range, custom text, or an automatically-incremented serial number.

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As you can see from the screen shot below, Printools is also available for InDesign. (Click the image to enlarge it.)

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Upgrades from previous versions of Printools are $49.99.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Use “Native Transparency” When Exporting for Graphics

When exporting a page (or part of a page) from QuarkXPress for use in App Studio or any other digital publishing program, it’s best to export in PDF format with “Native Transparency” turned ON (the default is OFF). Then open that PDF in Photoshop or another image editor and save it in PNG format.

PDF_Export_Options_Transparency

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

How To Combine Book Chapters To Export One PDF or E-book

This question came up today:

“I created a book in QuarkXPress, using separate documents for each chapter and connecting them with the Book feature. I created a Table of Contents for the whole book and built that TOC in the Master Chapter. How can I export a whole book as one PDF and have a TOC that is hyperlinked to the different chapters?

Currently, when I export as PDF it only includes the current Layout. When I print from the Book feature, and save as PDF, it exports only the Master document as a PDF.”

The solution is simple, if annoying:

You have to combine your documents into one Layout in QuarkXPress, then export to PDF. That’s the only way you’ll keep your hyperlinks.

The good news it’s a simple thing to do: just open your main document and all the chapter documents. Change your view to Thumbnails (View> Thumbnails). Select all the pages in each chapter and drag them onto the end of your main document. It shouldn’t take but a few minutes.

This technique also works for combining chapters before generating an EPUB book or iPad app.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

QuarkXPress 9 Bug: When Fonts Are Not Embedded in PDFs

Quark’s Web page of known issues in QuarkXPress 9 include this one:

If you export a PDF without embedding the fonts (File> Export> Layout as PDF> Options button> Fonts), then import that PDF and run Collect for Output (File menu) with Fonts checked, the fonts that are not embedded in the PDF are not collected.

While not really a “bug” (this is a logical result of fonts not being embedded into a PDF you’ve imported into QuarkXPress), it could trip up an unsuspecting user.

So… be sure to check that any PDFs you import into a QuarkXPress document have their fonts embedded! One way to determine that is to open the PDF in Adobe Acrobat or Reader and choose File> Properties... and look under the Fonts tab, as below:

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.