QuarkXPress 2015 now supported on El Capitan

Quark just released the El Capitan Update for QuarkXPress 2015.

Just run Auto Updater inside QuarkXPress or use the following link to download the El Capitan Update for QuarkXPress 2015:
http://www.quark.com/Support/Downloads/Details.aspx?fid=322

And Quark is getting quicker when it comes to adding support for new versions of OS X:

  • When Apple released Mountain Lion, it Quark 19 days to release an officially supported version of QuarkXPress (which was QuarkXPress 9.3.1)
  • When Apple released Mavericks, it took Quark 17 days to release an officially supported version of QuarkXPress (which were QuarkXPress 9.5.4 and 10.0.1)
  • When Apple released Yosemite, it took Quark 20 days to release an officially supported version of QuarkXPress (which was QuarkXPress 10.5)
  • Now, with El Capitan, it took Quark just 9 days to release an officially supported version of QuarkXPress (which is QuarkXPress 2015)

Still, when upgrading your OS X to El Capitan please remember to create yourself a backdoor beforehand:
http://www.planetquark.com/2015/09/28/how-to-create-yourself-a-backdoor-to-downgrade-os-x/

Users of QuarkXPress 10, 9, 8 and earlier:
Quark will not support any version prior to QuarkXPress 2015 on El Capitan.
Though not supported QuarkXPress 8 and 9 seem to “work” ok on El Capitan (with some flaws). QuarkXPress 10 crashes badly on El Capitan. The engineering team will look into the crash issues of QuarkXPress 10 on El Capitan to determine whether anything can be done about it, however we might not be able to, so this is not a promise. I will probably be able to comment on this in maybe 5-6 weeks from now.

QX2015-ACXTBundle-OfferScreen-US

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

QuarkXPress on El Capitan

EDIT: On October 9 Quark released the El Capitan Update for QuarkXPress 2015, so this article is obsolete. Please read this instead: http://www.planetquark.com/2015/10/09/quarkxpress2015-on-el-capitan/

On Sep 30, 2015, Apple released OS X El Capitan, also know as OS X 10.11.

Unfortunately as El Capitan handles some mouse movements differently than OS X versions before, QuarkXPress 10 and the current version of QuarkXPress 2015 crash once you move the mouse cursor over a palette.

So please do not use QuarkXPress on El Capitan for production yet.

Quark has a compatible version of QuarkXPress 2015 in pre-release tests which is ready to be released in October.

However as the release version of OS X El Capitan is a slightly newer version than the Golden Master Candidate, which Apple distributed several weeks ago, Quark is currently rechecking this new update of QuarkXPress 2015 with the release version of El Capitan.

If there are no surprises, Quark will release a QuarkXPress 2015 Update compatible to El Capitan within the next three weeks, so before October 22, 2015. That’s also the same time frame that it took Quark the past three years to make QuarkXPress officially support the newest version of OS X, so it looks like also this year it’ll stay within this time-frame.

Quark will inform you all once the El Capitan Update to QuarkXPress 2015 has been released. And of course this is a free update for QuarkXPress 2015.

And Quark will NOT support using versions before QuarkXPress 2015 on El Capitan. We do know of a crash bug of QuarkXPress 10 on El Capitan that we are currently looking into fixing. However, we will not support QuarkXPress 10 on El Capitan.

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

How to create yourself a backdoor to downgrade OS X

In a few days Apple will release a new major version of OS X. This year it is OS X El Capitan and as in the last years with Yosemite and Mavericks the upgrade is free of charge and will be distributed via the Mac App Store.

Though most of us are excited to try the new version, not everyone is aware that Apple doesn’t allow a downgrade. So once you have upgraded to El Capitan and not everything is running as you expected it, there’s no out of the box path to go back to your previous installation of OS X.

One way of downgrading of course could be to create a Time Machine backup and in the unlikely event of having to revert to your older OS X you can replace your installation with the backup. However that will take a while and you first need to upgrade.

Or you could google it, see whether others have encountered issues. Well, not really workable, as nobody is alike and hey, we are curious and want to get our hands on it, right?

So what’s best practice to test a new version of OS X to see whether you can use it in production?

If you have several machines, obviously the best way is to try it on a machine that is not critical in our production environment. However that has two downsides:

  • First, you really want to test the new version of OS X on your most use machine to see whether all applications and small tools are running fine.
  • Secondly, not everybody has two machines

Here’s how to safely test a new OS X and being able to revert immediately or – even better – to just temporarily revert to a previous version of OS X.

Important is that you do this BEFORE you install OS X El Capitan.

Best Practice to safely test a single Mac with a new version of OS X

Here’s my way of creating myself a backdoor to be able to revert and downgrade to a previous version of OS X.

If you just have one Internet device, please print this to be able to reference.

Before you start, please turn off Time Machine, as it might mess up your backups when working from a cloned disk.

  1. Buy an external hard disk that is at least as large as your internal hard disk (“Macintosh HD”) and connect it to your Mac.
  2. Use Disk Utility to format the external disk as “Mac OS Extended (Journaled)” and in options “GUID Partition Table”.
  3. Download Carbon Copy Cloner (http://bombich.com/). It has a free trial for 30 days, however I strongly recommend purchasing it (I have no shares in that company ;-) as it can save you a lot of trouble and money.
  4. Clone your hard disk to the external disk. So source is “Macintosh HD” and target is “External Drive”. Clone it completely. Everything. Bootable.
    Note that CCC tells you what it will create before doing it. Read the manual if you are unsure.
  5. Important: Reboot your Mac and hold the Option key pressed. Boot from the external hard disk. Note: This might take  longer than normal, as you are using a connection that is typically a bit slower than an internal hard disk. Test whether everything works as before (ignore the slight difference in speed), it’s important to check that this is a real clone. If everything has worked fine, that’s your 1:1 backup and it’s even bootable.
  6. Shut down your Mac. Unplug external hard disk. Restart.
  7. Now upgrade your Mac to the new OS X (so to OS X El Capitan).
  8. Look for upgrades of the applications and tools you use, update your printer drivers etc.
  9. Important: Test everything thoroughly. Test all the applications you use frequently, all goodies, see whether you like the UI, whether all your input and output devices work (scanners, printers etc.). You can even simulate production.

If everything works fine, you are done and can enjoy the new OS X. How does Murphy says “The only backup you’ll ever need is the one that you didn’t make.”

Ignore the rest of this list ;-)

 

Backdoor 1 (temporarily revert to the previous version of OS X)

If something does not work correctly or you can’t produce a specific file anymore and therefore you want to temporarily switch back to your previous version of OS X – maybe for one job –,  here’s how:

  1. First make sure that you save everything important that you have created since using the new OS X.
    So if you created a QuarkXPress document under El Capitan already and you’ll still need that, save it to a USB stick (or something similar).
  2. Now shutdown your Mac.
  3. Connect the external hard disk again.
  4. Important: Start your Mac from the external hard disk (by holding the Option key and choosing the external drive).
  5. Work.

Please take special care when using this way and remember that you are then working with two boot volumes. So once you decide for one, you need to make sure that all your work is copied from both disks.

 

Backdoor 2 (permanently revert to the previous version of OS X)

If you feel the new OS X isn’t right for you yet and you want to work with your previous version of OS X for the next weeks (and then maybe test again), here’s how how to downgrade OS X permanently:

  1. First make sure that you save everything important that you have created since using the new OS X.
    So if you created a QuarkXPress document under El Capitan already and you’ll still need that, save it to a USB stick (or something similar).
  2. Now shutdown your Mac.
  3. Connect the external hard disk again.
  4. Important: Start your Mac from the external hard disk (by holding the Option key and choosing the external drive).
  5. Use CCC (Carbon Copy Cloner) to duplicate the cloned drive back to your internal hard disk. Clone everything back from source “External Drive” to target “Macintosh HD”. That’s important, don’t clone it the other way around.
  6. Shut down your Mac. Remove external hard disk.
  7. Restart your Mac.
  8. Work

Everything should be now exactly the same as it was before you upgraded OS X. Test it to be sure. Remember to copy any files you saved on the USB stick to your drive and continue working. Make a mental note to try that in a few weeks again once the applications that haven’t worked correctly are updated to support OS X El Capitan.

 

Let me know please if this worked for you.

 

Another way of keeping a backdoor open (provided you have enough RAM and can compromise on speed that is) is to virtualize your previous (or new) OS X. Apple allows virtualization of OS X on OS X. So get Parallels or VMware Fusion and install the new or previous OS X you need. And that’s probably a topic for another blog post…

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Best Practise: How to safely test OS X Yosemite before using it for production

*** Update: As this is a reoccurring topic, I updated this: Originally written for Mavericks (OS X 10.9) in 2013, I updted this for Yosemite (OS X 10.10). The topic hasn’t changed from 2013 when Apple released a free update to OS X via the App Store.
If you update your production machine to a new version of OS X without an update and without having it tested thoroughly beforehand, then the chance is high that you’ll run into serious issues. Regardless which software you use for production! ***

In the light of the latest OS X upgrade I have been asked how to safely test a new version of OS X and be able to revert in case there are problems.

Best Practice to test a single Mac with a new version of OS X

The idea is to test in real-life all applications tools and devices needed for production, so that when an important application isn’t compatible or a printer doesn’t work, you can safely revert back to your last working state (and downgrade to the previous version of OS X: Mountain Lion). Of course you could first Google it and trust the experience of others, however a hands-on test often shows a different picture than others might have painted and it gives you the certainty that it will work for you.

I am sure there are many ways, but here’s mine that I have used successfully for many years:

  1. Buy an external hard disk that is at least as large as your internal hard disk (“Macintosh HD”) and connect it to your Mac.
  2. Use Disk Utility to format the external disk as “Mac OS Extended (Journaled)” and in options “GUID Partition Table”.
  3. Download Carbon Copy Cloner (http://www.bombich.com/index.html). It has a free trial for 30 days, however I strongly recommend purchasing it (I have no shares in that company ;-) as it can save you a lot of trouble and money.
    And Murphy says “The only backup you’ll ever need is the one that you didn’t make.”
  4. Clone your hard disk to the external disk. So source is “Macintosh HD” and target is “External Drive”. Clone it completely. Everything. Bootable. Note that CCC tells you what it will create before doing it. Read the manual if you are unsure.
  5. Important: Reboot your Mac and hold the Option key pressed. Boot from the external hard disk. Note: This might take  longer than normal, as you are using a connection that is typically a bit slower than an internal hard disk. Test whether everything works as before (ignore the slight difference in speed), it’s important to check that this is a real clone. If everything has worked fine, that’s your 1:1 backup and it’s even bootable.
  6. Shut down your Mac. Unplug external hard disk. Restart.
  7. Now upgrade your Mac to the new OS X (e.g. Mavericks or Yosemite).
  8. Look for upgrades of the applications and tools you use, update your printer drivers etc.
  9. Important: Test everything thoroughly. Test all the applications you use frequently, all goodies, see whether you like the UI, whether all your input and output devices work (scanners, printers etc.). You can even simulate production.
  10. If everything works fine, you are done and can enjoy the new OS X. Ignore the rest of this list ;-)

If something doesn’t work correctly or you can’t produce anymore and you want to go back to your previous OS X that was working fine, here’s how:

  1. First make sure that you save everything important that you have created using the new OS X, e.g. if you created a QuarkXPress document under Mavericks already and you’ll still need that after reverting, save it to a USB stick (or something similar).
  2. Now shutdown your Mac. Connect the external hard disk again.
  3. Important: Start your Mac from the external hard disk (by holding the Option key and choosing the external drive).
  4. Use CCC (Carbon Copy Cloner) to duplicate the cloned drive back to your internal hard disk. Clone everything back from source “External Drive” to target “Macintosh HD”. That’s important, don’t clone it the other way around.
  5. Shut down your Mac. Remove external hard disk.
  6. Restart your Mac. Everything should be now exactly the same as it was before you upgraded OS X. Test it to be sure.
  7. Remember to copy any files you saved on the USB stick to your drive and continue working. Make a mental note to try that in a few weeks again once the applications that haven’t worked correctly are updated to support Mavericks.

Let me know please if this worked for you.

 

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.