New Guide “Digital Publishing with QuarkXPress 2016”

Quark release a new manual called “Digital Publishing with QuarkXPress 2016”.

It can be found here and describes how to create app content for native apps, ebooks in the EPUB2 and EPUB3 format (reflow and fixed-layout) and HTML5 Publications:

http://files.quark.com/download/documentation/QuarkXPress/2016/English/Digital_Publishing_with_QXP_2016_EN.pdf

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Export a Table of Contents to PDF and EPUB

Today, we published an eBook that I built in QuarkXPress, and I was delighted at how easy it was to generate a Table of Contents for both the PDF and EPUB versions of the book!

Details on how to do it are in our previously published tip here, but the short version is:

  • Choose Edit> Lists and select the Style Sheet you want to use for your Table of Contents. All the Paragraphs that you applied this Style Sheet to will be included in the Table of Contents.
  • Create a text box somewhere, possibly on a new last page — you’ll delete it later, so don’t worry about formatting it.
  • Fill the text box with your List (TOC) by selecting it and choosing Window> Lists and then clicking the Build button in the Lists palette:

Lists_palette

  • When you export to PDF, make sure that “Export Lists as Bookmarks” is enabled in the PDF Options. Each item in the List will appear as a separate Bookmark in the PDF.

Ta da! (Well, almost… you’ll probably want to open the PDF and delete the temporary page that contains the List text box.)

To include your TOC in your EPUB or Kindle file as you export it from QuarkXPress, do this:

  • Choose Window> Reflow Table of Contents:

Reflow_Table_of_Contents_palette

  • Click the Pencil (Edit) icon in the Reflow Table of Contents palette and choose a Style Sheet from your document. When you export your eBook, QuarkXPress will build a TOC that includes entries for every paragraph you applied that Style Sheet to.

For more details on using Lists and Hyperlinks, see our earlier post: “Easy Hyperlinks in QuarkXPress that Export into PDFs”.

And for a look at the book we made, see The Skinny on Photoshop Tips” here.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Guide to Fixed Layout ePubs

FieldGuideFixedLayout

A “Fixed Layout” e-book is probably the dumbest of all e-book formats. It’s essentially a copy of an existing book’s layout, and requires the reader to pinch and pan to TRY to read it.

Still, some books are OK in that format — photo books, some children’s books, some illustrated textbooks, and some cookbooks.

To learn lots more about converting a book to a fixed-layout e-book, see the continually-updated “Field Guide to Fixed Layout for E-Book”, available in PDF or EPUB format from the Book Industry Study Group here.

For a bit more info, see Steve Werner’s post here.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Recover Kodak Photo CD Images

graphicconverter7_1

If you have old Kodak Photo CDs, you may want to consider converting them to a current file format such as TIFF, and one way to do that is with GraphicConverter for Mac OS X ($40).

Few apps other than GraphicConverter support the defunct Photo CD format, and it can convert a long list of other abandoned image formats, too.

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.

Which font for your ePub?

Finding fonts for Digital Publications is not very difficult — mostly you’ll be searching for fonts that are display well on screens.

The more difficult task can be licensing, as every font vendor has different licensing schemes, and some do not even allow you to embed their fonts in a PDF…

When creating native apps or other “encapsulated” file formats, where it is hard for the average user to get to the embedded fonts, I would recommend contacting your font vendor of choice and ask about licensing. Of course you could always rasterize a font, but that’s not really a good choice in regards to accessibility, readability and searchability, especially when using a Digital Publishing solution like App Studio, which by default keeps text as text (HTML5).

But what about ePubs? ePubs are basically a ZIP archive that contain the font file in a reusable format once you unzipped it. And I could understand that font vendors might be hesitant to license fonts for ePubs.

My recommendation: Use an OpenSource font for your reflowable ePub.

As ePubs typically are not displaying as designed, but reflow where line breaks do not matter anyhow, you are probably not so much concerned about CI. Otherwise you shouldn’t really create an ePub, a native app would be the better format.

And remember that in most Readers (hardware and software readers) your customer can switch font, so even if you carefully chose one, they might display everything in Times or Helvetica anyway.

So, if you decide for an OpenSource font that reads well on screen, my recommendation is Droid:

DroidFontAtFontSquirrel

You can find Droid here (and other fonts that are free for commerical use): http://www.fontsquirrel.com/foundry/Google-Android

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.