New Guide “Digital Publishing with QuarkXPress 2016”

Quark release a new manual called “Digital Publishing with QuarkXPress 2016”.

It can be found here and describes how to create app content for native apps, ebooks in the EPUB2 and EPUB3 format (reflow and fixed-layout) and HTML5 Publications:

http://files.quark.com/download/documentation/QuarkXPress/2016/English/Digital_Publishing_with_QXP_2016_EN.pdf

 

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Digital Magazine Award Winners for 2013

DMA_2013_logo

Which digital magazines are the best right now? Have a look at the press release below for this year’s award winners — and be sure to click through to the website for links to all the winning magazines!

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Digital Magazine Awards Winners Announced

LONDON – December 12, 2013 – The international Digital Magazine Awards, in association with App StudioTMand the Dwell Agency, announced the winners of the 2013 competition at a showcase event held at the Proud Gallery in London.

From a field of entries spanning 41 countries and hundreds of nominations, the 2013 winners are:

  • Digital Magazine of the Year: Katachi
  • Magazine Cover of the Year, as voted for by the public through Guardian Masterclasses: Teradata
  • Magazine Launch of the Year (New Format): Jamie Magazine
  • Magazine Launch of the Year (New Title): BOYD and Bande à part Magazine de cinéma
  • Children’s Magazine of the Year: Cbeebies and Timbuktu
  • Customer Magazine of the Year: Morrisons
  • Film, TV & Entertainment Magazine of the Year: Empire
  • Fashion Magazine of the Year: Katachi
  • Food & Drink Magazine of the Year: BBC Good Food
  • Men’s Lifestyle Magazine of the Year: British GQ
  • Women’s Lifestyle Magazine of the Year: Katachi
  • Magazine Advertisement of the Year: Crash Test, Peugeot (the goodfellas)
  • Magazine Website of the Year: Esquire.co.uk
  • Motoring Magazine of the Year: BBC Top Gear
  • Music Magazine of the Year: Clash Music
  • News & Business Magazine of the Year: TLQ
  • Science & Nature Magazine of the Year: Australian Geographic
  • Specialist Magazine of the Year: Edge
  • Sports, Health & Fitness Magazine of the Year: Men’s Health (US)
  • Technology & Gadget Magazine of the Year: Swipe
  • Travel Magazine of the Year: Travel + Escape
  • Visual Arts Magazine of the Year: Computer Arts
  • Editor of the Year: Gillian Carter – BBC Good Food
  • Designer of the Year: Phil Haycraft – Edge
  • Publisher/Manager of the Year: Simon Carrington – BBC Top Gear

For a full list of winners and judges’ quotes visit: http://digitalmagazineawards.com/  

Bruce Hudson, Digital Magazine Awards’ Chairman, said, “Congratulations to the 2013 Digital Magazine Awards winners. We have experienced record entry levels as well as record attendance and interest in this year’s awards. The digital magazine industry has seen tangible signs of market growth, profitability and creative ingenuity setting it in fantastic stead for the future. I’m already looking forward in anticipation to next year’s awards to see how this burgeoning sector has progressed!”

Shaun Barriball, Vice President of Mobile Products for App Studio, said, “The caliber of entries winning Digital Magazine Awards this year is spectacular. It’s proof that consumers are demanding interactive digital experiences and brands are responding. While publishers of business-to-consumer content have found demand for iPad-optimized editions, so too now are business-to-business publishers. The bar for compelling digital editions is being raised all the time as devices get better and better.”

About App Studio
App Studio (www.appstudio.net) is the next generation digital publishing solution that uses HTML5 to push the bounds of user experience without the high cost and effort associated with custom app development. App Studio is the only digital publishing solution that allows users to create branded content apps using QuarkXPress, InDesign, HTML5 and XML. Through a managed cloud environment, designers, authors and extended teams are able to collaborate to create rich, interactive content that can be delivered across multiple platforms and devices.

About Dwell Agency
Dwell Agency (www.dwellagency.co.uk) engages the advertising industry on the interactive potential of digital magazines by creating next generation adverts which connect a brand with its target audience through impressive on-page dwell times. Dwell combines over 20 years publishing experience and in-depth knowledge of the world’s best digital magazines with the cream of the UK’s interactive coding designers. Digital Magazine Awards’ founder Bruce Hudson launched Dwell to work with publishers, advertisers, media planners and brands to optimize print ad creative into brand-led interactive ads.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

How to discover the UDID of an iPad without having iTunes

Today I was asked by an agency of a large customer how to discover the UDID (serial number) of an iPad without using iTunes.

Background

The reason for wanting the UDID is simple: the agency is creating a test app using App Studio and wants to send the customer a branded iOS test app. To do that without hacking (jail-breaking) the iPad, you need the UDID (basically the extended serial number) of the device so you can put that into Apple’s developer portal to create the correct provisioning profiles.

Typically you’d plug the iPad into a Mac or Windows computer, launch iTunes and copy the UDID from there (click on the Serial Number field, which displays the UDID, and press Command+C). Here’s what that looks like:

itunes_udid

The problem is that in many large enterprises, the IT department doesn’t allow personal applications such as iTunes on your computer and also doesn’t allow you to install an application (such as iTunes) yourself.

What won’t work (and don’t believe them) — aka fake UDID

There are many apps in the App Store that promise to give you the UDID. Don’t believe that. Yes, in the past this was possible, however Apple has removed that ability, probably as some app creators misused that and tracked what you were doing (a UDID is a unique number that you can identify).

It’s easy to find out if a UDID is fake — if such an app gives you back a UDID starting with “ffff” then it is a fake ID. (Apple’s iOS will generate a fake ID for apps that are still using the old API to get the UDID).

 

How to discover a UDID without having iTunes

 

If you are on OS X:

You can use any of these methods:

A: Plug the iPad into a Mac and use “System Report”:

  1. Using a USB cable connect your iPad to any OS X computer.
  2. Go to “About this Mac” (under the Apple menu)
  3. Click “More Info…”
  4. Click “System Report” which will open “System Information”
  5. In the left sidebar navigate to the section “USB” and select it
  6. You should see your iPad (or iPod or iPhone) there.
  7. In the section of your device it says “Serial Number” which lists a 40-character text string. That’s your UDID.
  8. Here’s a screenshot of the USB section:

systeminformation_udid

 

B: Use “Apple Configurator” or “iPhone Configuration Utility”

  • If you have “iPhone Configuration Utility” (ICU) or “Apple Configurator” (AC) installed, that also lists the UDIDs of all iOS devices that have been connected once (while ICU/AC was running of course). So launch it and plug in your device.
  • Alternatively you can ask your IT, they probably have the ICU/AC tool and have the UDID present.
  • Here’s a screenshot of the ICU (click to enlarge):

icu_udid

 

C: If you’ve ever used iTunes to back up your iPad

If you had iTunes previously installed and had ever backed up the iPad to your Mac, then there’s a way to find out the UDID by looking into the file system of OS X. In the Finder, go to /User/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup
In that folder you’ll find one or more folders — one for each device you backed up. The folder name is the UDID.

 

D: Use a Test App Service or website using certificates

  • You can also use apps or websites that install certificates, which tell you the UDID. Using websites you don’t know is always a bad idea — I found one that looks trustworthy, but as I do not know the company, I cannot recommend them, even though they might be totally trustworthy. If you want to try them yourself (and I take NO responsibility for what happens!), this is the URL: http://get.udid.io
  • You can try an “app” (it’s a Web app) that installs certificates. The one I have used often to distribute apps without having to install certificates is TestFlight: http://testflightapp.com

However, both of these methods require you to have the password to install certificates on your iOS device — which in this scenario you probably don’t have. :-)

 

E: More?

If you know of more methods, please let me know and I’ll add them.

 

If you are on Windows:

You can use any of these methods:

A: Plug the iPad into a computer and use the registry

  1. Using a USB cable connect your iPad to any Windows computer. I am using Windows 7, but it should be similar when using other versions of Windows.
  2. IMPORTANT: in the following steps DO NOT modify anything, as changing the registry might break your Windows installation.
  3. Start Regedit (e.g. by clicking on the Start button, and typing “RegEdit” in the search field)
  4. Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\USB (it’s basically a folder structure)
  5. You will see all USB devices in there — find the one that’s your iPad. It might say “Apple iPad”, in my case it had a cryptic name, so I had to open all sub folders under “USB”. However on the level below there’s already a folder with a 40-character string and by selecting that it says “Friendly Name” = “Apple iPad”.
  6. Copy (DO NOT MODIFY) that name (e.g. right clicking and selecting “Copy Key Name”). When you paste it in a text editor, the UDID is the last 40 characters.
  7. Here’s a screenshot of RegEdit:

regedit_udid

 

B: Use iPhone Configuration Utility

As far as I know, Apple Configurator isn’t available for Windows (yet?). Instead, use iPhone Configuration Utility for Windows: start it and plug in your device. For details see above (under OS X): it is the same procedure.

You can find ICU for Windows here:  http://support.apple.com/downloads/#iphone%20configuration%20utility

 

C: Finding out when having done a backup once

If you had iTunes previously installed and had ever done a backup locally, then there’s a way to discover the UDID by looking into the file system of Windows here: Users/User/AppData/Roaming/AppleComputer/MobileSync/Backup
There you’ll find a folder for every iOS device you’ve backed up. The folder name is the UDID.

 

D: Use a Test App Service or website using certificates

  • You can also use apps or websites that install certificates, which tell you the UDID. Using websites you don’t know is always a bad idea — I found one that looks trustworthy, but as I do not know the company, I cannot recommend them, even though they might be totally trustworthy. If you want to try them yourself (and I take NO responsibility for what happens!), this is the URL: http://get.udid.io
  • You can try an “app” (it’s a Web app) that installs certificates. The one I have used often to distribute apps without having to install certificates is TestFlight: http://testflightapp.com

However, both of these methods require you to have the password to install certificates on your iOS device — which in this scenario you probably don’t have. :-)

 

E: More?

If you know of more methods, please let me know and I’ll add them.

 

Footnote: For security reasons I blurred my UDID in all screenshots.

 

Create as many apps as you want – for free, from your Desktop?

Export_As_iOS

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

European Association Chooses App Studio for Digital Journal Publishing

Below is a success story about using App Studio to generate an iPad app for a professional journal. It’s interesting that they use XML content, which is transformed into HTML5 in App Studio.

Note that you can download it for free — a great way to see what other publishers are accomplishing with their iPad apps:

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EASL_pull-quote

European Association for the Study of the Liver Chooses App Studio for Digital Journal Publishing

Quark Software Inc. announced today that EASL (European Association for the Study of the Liver) has selected App Studio to create the Journal of Hepatology iPad app. The app is available through iTunes and is free to subscribers.

EASL has an impressive track record in promoting research into liver disease, supporting wider education and promoting changes in European liver policy. The association’s primary publication, the Journal of Hepatology, was already available in print and online. To reach an audience that increasingly relies on mobile devices for research and data collection, EASL needed a digital publishing solution that could fit seamlessly into its workflow and render XML-based content and InDesign files as compelling iPad experiences.

With an interactive app for the iPad, EASL has increased the value of content for subscribers by making it more relevant, discoverable and usable. As App Studio creates real, selectable and searchable text, readers can easily search for specific articles, link to related content, bookmark articles, add notes and more. This interactivity improves the relevance of the content and encourages increased user engagement.

After evaluating a number of digital publishing solutions used by medical journal publishers, EASL selected App Studio. The New England Journal of Medicine, British Medical Journal, Health Affairs, Wiley Cochrane Library and others choose App Studio because it provides easy ingestion of NLMXML content and an app experience optimized for journal reading. The XML content is transformed into paginated HTML5 that is responsive to support the iPad in both portrait and landscape orientations. It also supports a wide range of interactive enrichments, digital ad serving infrastructure, analytics, CRM integration and social media.

“We are proud to offer our subscribers the iPad edition of the Journal of Hepatology,” said Gregoire Pavillon, Executive Director of EASL. “The ability to automate digital journal publishing using the XML content and InDesign files we already create set App Studio apart from other solutions that either can’t support XML or only allow for digital PDF output. It was clear to us that the App Studio team understands journal publishing.”

The Journal of Hepatology iPad app allows readers to:

— Quickly navigate through articles
— View figures and tables in full screen
— Bookmark and share articles
— Download and store supplementary materials and PowerPoint slides
— Watch videos related to specific articles
— Store monthly issues in a personal library

Shaun Barriball, Vice President of Mobile Products at Quark said, “It is a pleasure to partner with EASL to create the Journal of Hepatology app. At Quark we have a strong pedigree in producing tablet apps for medical journals and have developed an approach to designing and building apps in the most efficient way possible.”

About EASL 
EASL is the leading European scientific society involved in promoting research and education in hepatology. EASL attracts the foremost hepatology experts and has an impressive track record in promoting research in liver disease, supporting wider education and promoting changes in European liver policy. EASL’s main focus on education and research is delivered through numerous events and initiatives, including:

— The International Liver CongressTM which is the main scientific and professional event in hepatology worldwide
— Meetings including Monothematic and Special conferences, Post Graduate courses and other endorsed meetings that take place throughout the year
— Clinical and Basic Schools of Hepatology, a series of events covering different aspects in the field of hepatology
— Journal of Hepatology published monthly
— Participation in a number of policy initiatives at European level

Hepatology_cover

About App Studio for Digital Journals 
App Studio (http://www.AppStudio.net) is the leading digital publishing platform for journal apps and is used by journal publishers around the world including the New England Journal of Medicine, British Medical Journal, and Health Affairs. Content can be automatically repurposed from content management systems using industry XML standards such as NLMXML and Atom+MRSS. By leveraging HTML5 for content presentation, journal publishers can create apps for iPad, iPhone, Kindle Fire and Android tablets and smartphones. It is also possible to create Web apps, giving subscribers an engaging digital, interactive experience that includes audio and video on desktop and laptop computers. Real text search, interactive charts and support for citations, cross-referencing, bookmarking, tracking and sharing are just some of the features that make App Studio a compelling solution for digital journals.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Removal of skeuomorphism, parallax effects and the oxymoron in iOS7

Later this month App Studio will release its next major version, v4.

As announced (and expected) App Studio v4 will change its design to match iOS7 streamlined design, removing most skeuomorphs and providing a stunning app design.

While probably most designers will like the new flat design of App Studio apps, I am sure there will be others.

Flat design, as iOS7 promotes it and what seems to be fashionable nowadays, has divided the design community.

I saw a funny tweet about iOS7 icons:

“Some free wireframe…er… I mean iOS 7, icons. http://t.co/J591HYmSU1

— Francisco Inchauste (@iamFinch) September 24, 2013

It’s true, many flat icons do look like wireframes. So the question is, for a good User Experience, does it need more? I found an interesting article about skeumorphism in UX magazine:

“We shouldn’t abandon cultural affordances like skeuomorphs because some find them tacky or overused.”

http://uxmag.com/articles/does-skeuomorphic-design-matter

Personally I am torn. I can see the advantage of simplicity which can solve the obtrusiveness of many UIs. On the other hand good UXD (User Experience Design) adds guidance and narration especially for new users/uses. So I am looking forward to feedback to the new design.

And humans seem to be attracted to cool effects, otherwise I couldn’t explain the fascination for Photoshop’s page curl effect, Flash-based flip-book catalogs and other “serve no other purpose than look cool” effects in the past.

Apple seemed to have been torn too, or why else did iOS 7 get rid of almost all skeuomorphism and added heavy use of parallax and motion-zoom effects instead? Isn’t a parallax effect a skeuomorphism?

For me that is the oxymoron in iOS7 ;-)

 

 

 

Glossary:

  • Skeuomorphism: User Interface elements that emulate objects of the physical world, e.g. a trashcan to delete something.
  • Parallax effect: Technique in computer programs and UIs, where background images move slower slower than foreground images, creating an illusion of depth (3D).
  • Oxymoron: A figure of speech or thing that combines contradictory terms or paradox items, like a “plastic glass” (for drinking).

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.