How to see previews of QuarkXPress documents – even without having QuarkXPress running or installed

QuickLook / Quick View images and other files

Often you need to see a preview of documents that you have on Mac. With images that’s easy, by setting the right preferences MacOS / OS X will show you thumbnails of images and even previews when you select an image and hit the spacebar.

That’s possible because Apple built an interesting technology into MacOS / OS X called QuickLook.

QuickLook can either create or extract previews in certain file types and present them to you, so that it is easier to find out whether it is the right file.

JPG, PDF, movies, audio files, text files and many more.

What about QuarkXPress documents?

You might not have QuarkXPress running or need to visually see a QuarkXPress document on a Mac where you do not have QuarkXPress installed.

On Macs, where you have QuarkXPress installed, this is easy, just hit the spacebar. As QuarkXPress will have installed a QuickLook plug-in on first launch, Finder can show you thumbnails and previews of QuarkXPress documents.

On Macs, where you do not have QuarkXPress installed, you can install a free QuickLook plug-in (made by Quark) to also see previews and thumbnails of QuarkXPress documents. Here’s an extract of an article on forums.quark.com:

Free QuickLook plug-in to preview QuarkXPress projects
This will allow you to see thumbnails of QuarkXPress Projects (.qxp) in Finder and also provide a QuickLook preview.
This works for .qxp files created with QuarkXPress 7, 8, 9, 10, 2015 and 2016; regardless whether you have QuarkXPress installed or not.

1. Download the zipped QuickLook plug-in: Click to download QXP QuickLook plug-in

2. Unzip it.(Unzip by double-clicking the downloaded file.)

3. Navigate to folder /Library/QuickLook/(That’s the main ‘Library’ folder on your Macintosh HD.)

4. Put the QuickLook plug-in into this folder.(So copy the file ‘QuarkXPress.qlgenerator’ there. Finder will probably ask you for permission. If you already find one in there, replace it.)

5. Log off and log on again.

(To test whether it works, you can download a sample QXP file: Click to download sample QXP)

And what about “exotic” file formats?

If you have other file formats that you often need to preview and out-of-the-box MacOS doesn’t handle them, then have a look at the following great site, it lists all known QuickLook plug-ins – free and commercial – available for MacOS / OS X:

http://www.quicklookplugins.com/

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Arabic Text in QuarkXPress 10

If you need to include Arabic text in a publication — either printed or in digital form — here’s the solution:
Layout Ltd.’s ArabicXT is an XTension for QuarkXPress 7/8/9/10 that lets you set bi-directional type in in the Arabic, Farsi, Hebrew, Jawi, and Kurdish languages, without requiring an Arabic operating system.
You can create text that flows either right-to-left or left-to-right and paragraphs that flow in opposite directions. It supports Arabic and Roman script in the same document, with automatic Kashida insertion.

ArabicXT includes 46 high-quality Arabic fonts, and costs $469. Upgrade to version 10 from 4/5/6 costs $431, upgrade from 7/8/9 costs $394.

(Further information is also available at http://www.layoutltd.com/products.php#publishing-tools)

Batch Print and Export from QuarkXPress and InDesign

Exportools Professional 3.0 is a standalone application that allows you to print or export files from QuarkXPress 8 and InDesign CS3/CS4. This is achieved by either manually dropping files into Exportools’ file list, or into a watched folder.

Print and export settings are assigned ahead of time, so the output happens automatically. Use the built-in pre-flighting to determine if files are ready for output, and use the auto-naming feature to automate file export creation. This new version is only compatible with Snow Leopard, as it’s been completely re-designed.

In case you’re using QuarkXPress 7, the previous version works on OS X 10.4.2 and up and processes QuarkXPress 7 files. Exportools costs $189.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Import/Export CAD to Illustrator

If you’ve ever been handed a CAD file to use in a page layout, you’ll appreciate this:

Baby Universe’s EXDXF-Pro3 is a plug-in for Adobe Illustrator that lets you import CAD-standard DXF files and export Illustrator files to CAD. It costs just $90.

Use it to get those CAD files into a format that works in your graphic design projects!

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.

FlightAlert Warns of Errors Before Output

CompuSense’s FlightAlert is an XTension for QuarkXPress 4–8 that warns users of a variety of file-creation errors, such as RGB TIFF and EPS graphics, 1-bit TIFFs and EPSes, empty picture boxes, missing or modified graphics, missing fonts in EPS files, text overflow, text with Bold or Italic applied styles, spot colors used, rotated items, suppressed-print items, graphics files larger or smaller than specified allowable sizes, and graphics containing a definable file extension (such as FPO).

Alerts can be displayed at Open, at Close, at Print, at Save as EPS, at Save or Save As, or when collected for output. The collect-for-output mechanism collects a document or multiple documents, all linked graphics, screen and printer fonts (including embedded fonts within EPS graphics), and optionally, the XPress Preferences file. Its AutoFind feature will scan volumes or folders to find missing elements. Collected elements can be compressed into a self-extracting archive.

FlightAlert costs $139.

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.