Fix for failed PDF Export from QuarkXPress 10

If your QuarkXPress 10 document fails to export to PDF, with QuarkXPress displaying a message like this one:

Export_PDF>Fail

Or, you try to print the document and QuarkXPress displays this message before continuing:

Jaws_PPD_missing

Try turning on Export Transparency Natively in the PDF Options when you export:

ExportAsPDF>Options

Export_PDF>Options>Transparency>Natively

Note: This problem came up for me today on two documents: one of the documents has a radial fill in it, so I suppose this makes sense for that one. However, the second document contained nothing but black text. So while I’m happy the solution worked, I can’t explain it.

 

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

How to control QuarkXPress with function keys (F-keys)

If you rely on function keys (F-keys) for controlling various activities in QuarkXPress — such as showing and hiding item outlines and palettes — your Mac can get in the way. By default, Mac OS X uses F1, F2, F3, and the others for controlling brightness, iTunes, sound levels, and so forth.

Fortunately, it’s easy (if not obvious) to switch those keys back to their best use for QuarkXPress. Just open System Preferences from the Apple menu and click on Keyboard. Then, enable the checkbox labeled “Use all F1, F2, etc. keys as standard function keys“:

MacPrefs>Keyboard>Fkeys_annotated

This reverses the behavior of the Function keys, so that now if you want to change the brightness, volume, iTunes song, etc., just hold down the “fn” key on your keyboard while pressing one of those F-keys.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Photoshop CC & Plug-ins

Photoshop_CC_totem_1.25in_300ppi

With version CC of Photoshop, Adobe has eliminated the option to have a separate “Additional Plug-Ins Folder”.

And because CC is entirely different, you can’t just drag your CS6 plug-ins into the CC plug-ins folder. Instead, you must check each plug-in manufacturer’s website for the latest version of your plug-in, then reinstall it into Photoshop CC.

Fun!

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.

Scanning and Photoshop CS6

If you’re having trouble using your scanner with Photoshop CS6, you’re definitely not alone! Have a look at my story at Macworld: “Get your scanner to work with Photoshop CS6“.

The problem involves TWAIN, 32-bit code, and the march of time. The solution involves thinking a little bit outside the box. ;-)

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

FontNuke Fixes Font Problems

FontNuke (free) is a valuable timesaving utility for Mac OS X that removes corrupt system font caches, Adobe font caches (*.lst), QuarkXPress font caches, and Microsoft Office font caches. Use it when your applications begin to crash and fonts seem to be involved.

FontNuke requires Mac OS X 10.4 or higher, and is compatible with 10.8 Mountain Lion. Conveniently, you don’t need administrative privileges to use it!

Get this free utility at www.jamapi.com/pr/fn/

Jeff Gamet is a contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, the executive summary of graphic design news. He is also the morning editor and reviews editor for The Mac Observer and iPodObserver.com, and contributing writer for Layers Magazine and Photoshop User. He writes the InBrief column for InDesign Magazine, and is the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X,” from Peachpit Press

When Jeff isn’t writing about the graphic design world, he’s talking about it on the Design Tools Weekly podcast with co-host Jay Nelson. He also talks about Apple and the Mac world every week on The Mac Observer’s Apple Weekly Report.

Jeff studies, tests and reviews new software and technologies for the Macintosh community as well as the design and print industries. He is a former Pre-press specialist, and has nearly 25 years experience with computer technology. Jeff trains, lectures and consults on techniques for more efficiently using Mac OS X in creative environments throughout the country.

In the rare moments when he can get away from his MacBook Pro, Jeff spends his time climbing and biking in the Colorado mountains.