Do you still work this way? Modern ways to share Print layouts over the internet

Often you want to share a Print layout over the internet. What are your options?

 

The “old” way

PDF?

Typically you might create a screen PDF and put it on your webserver. Though great for Print, PDF have several shortcomings over the web. In a browser they look strange (double navigation). On mobile devices they do not really offer interactivity. And accessibility depends on how you created the PDF. And so on.

Flash???

Not really. Go six years back and though Flash was widely spread it was already not the ideal format. Security holes, high CPU requirements (remember the fans of your device starting to howl?) and – maybe worst – they never worked on mobile devices.

Flipbook Services?

Sure, they offer you a one-stop solution. Typically you submit a PDF to them, pay them a fee and they create some kind of interactive format. In the past often Flash, nowadays some kind of HTML.

Have you ever used a flipbook? The issues beside having to pay a fee and maybe having to host it somewhere outside your web infrastructure are in my humble opinion the user experience:

Often these flipbooks only offer two zoom levels, one that lets you hardly read text, the other so large that it is difficult panning around. Text is often an image, which doesn’t make them available to accessibility features like screen readers (to read out loud). “Searching” is mostly not possible in the browser, it’s prefabricated in the UI. And interactivity is limited to maybe videos and audio. And should the flipbook service decide to discontinue the service, you are stuck again.

 

The modern way: Pixel-perfect HTML5

Wouldn’t it be great if you could just convert a Print layout with three mouse clicks to an interactive, web-friendly format? That allows you to add interactivity, works in a browser, giving you search and magnification?

And of course it should work on all devices, Desktop and mobile. And without additional fees.

That’s what HTML5 Publications promise to do:

  1. Convert out of a Print layout created in QuarkXPress 2016 with just three clicks
  2. Export standard HTML5
  3. Run on all platforms (mobile and desktop browsers)
  4. Text stays text and all typographic and design features are kept, pixel-perfect, as you created them
  5. No extra charge (besides QuarkXPress and web space)

Have a look how easily this is created out of QuarkXPress 2016, as many and as often as you want:

 

Best of all, using the free Test Drive of QuarkXPress 2016 you can try that yourself for 30 days:
http://content.quark.com/QX2016_RequestLP-EN.html

Warning:

If you use PostScript fonts (Type-1 fonts) then these will not work in HTML5. You have two options to replicate your Pritn layout as HTML5 Publication then:

  1. Substitute the Type-1 font with a TrueType font or OpenType font. Both formats will work well and keep typographic features such as kerning.
  2. If you need to keep your Type-1 font, then make sure QuarkXPress exports these text boxes as an image. You can define that in the measurement palette when being in a Digital layout. At the very right for each text box there’s a check box besides a small camera symbol to “Convert to Graphic Upon Export”. Use Item Find/Change to easily change all text boxes to export as image.

In the next post I’ll show you how to add interactivity like video, animations and slideshows and how to deploy them on your own webserver.

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Book about QuarkXPress 2016 storms amazon’s Bestseller charts

Exciting: Martin Turner’s book about QuarkXPress 2016 storms amazon.com’s and amazon.co.uk’s Bestseller charts in the category “Desktop Publishing”:

For a few days now it has been on #1 in either chart, the hot new releases in the US and the absolute bestsellers in the UK.

Here’s a snapshot of the charts today:

Amazon.com (Hot new releases):

amazoncom

 

Amazon.co.uk (Absolute Bestsellers):

amazoncouk

 

As the book is available on amazon with “Look Inside”, please preview the book to see what it covers. In my humble opinion it not only gives you great background on QuarkXPress 2016 and all its new features, it’s more than that: It also helps you understand brand considerations, design rules, printing and finishing techniques.

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

First book about QuarkXPress 2016 now available

The first book about QuarkXPress 2016 is now available, so even before QuarkXPress 2016 will be officially released tomorrow (May 24).

You can order it through Amazon US or Amazon UK and other national sites from amazon.

The interesting thing is that this book is not only about QuarkXPress, it is also about design and brand considerations, about print processes and about finishing. So definitely an interesting read, I can highly recommend it.

Martin, the author of the book, who is also an author for Planet Quark, says about it:

““Over the years, I’ve seen dozens of designers, some straight from college, some hardened veterans, whose work came to a halt because they lacked some crucial piece of knowledge. In this book, I have tried to include the answers to all of their questions, and to uncover the richer possibilities that QuarkXPress 2016 offers. Its new features—especially native import and HTML5 publishing—allow us to be more productive, more creative and more satisfied in our work. Whether in print or online, more than ever before, QuarkXPress 2016 gives us the power to delight the eye and intrigue the mind.”

Both an engineer and a layout artist, Matthias bridges the gap between technology and people.

Before joining Quark, Matthias pioneered print, Web, and multimedia products for multiple German publishing companies. Since 1997 he has played a central role in shaping Quark’s desktop and enterprise software.
Starting 2003 Matthias has focused on Quark’s interactive and digital publishing solutions. He is an active participant in design and publishing communities and represents Quark in the Ghent PDF Workgroup.

Since February 2014 Matthias heads Quark’s Desktop Publishing business unit and is therefore responsible for QuarkXPress.

Victorian Engravings

www.Artzooks.com includes the Visual Language collection in its collection of premium clip art.

Visual Language includes more than 1,000 extremely detailed illustrations from the early 1900s. Subject matter includes plants, fruits and flowers, animals and human anatomy, machines and equipment, picture frames, mountains and landscapes, maps, holiday figures, etc. The collection is worth a look, if only for inspiration.

To find it, search for “Visual Language” and then uncheck “Photographs” under Image Type.

ArtZooks-Visual-Language

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.

Royalty-Free Design Templates

Need to design a brochure, business card, letterhead, envelope, postcard, datasheet, flyer, or newsletter in a hurry? You can find artistic, original designs for affordable prices at Inkd: a growing community of designers and the businesses who need design work.

Each design comes with a royalty-free license and is fully customizable. Most files are Adobe InDesign or Illustrator, though Photoshop or QuarkXPress files are available upon request. If you can’t find a design you like, you can hire a designer on a freelance basis or make a special request.

When a print template is sold on Inkd, customers can contact the graphic designer directly for associated services such as helping to customize the template, development of a new corporate identity or designing a matching website. If you’re a print designer, you can sign up to be a contributor and receive royalties on each sale.

Prices range from $39 for a flyer or business card to $99 for a trifold brochure. For more information, visit www.inkd.com.

Jay Nelson is the editorial director of PlanetQuark.com, and the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly. He’s also the author of the QuarkXPress 8 and QuarkXPress 7 training titles at Lynda.com, as well as the training videos Quark includes in the box with QuarkXPress 7 . In addition, Jay writes regularly for Macworld and Photoshop User magazines and speaks at industry events.